Monday, August 7, 2017

Don Baylor, R.I.P.

One of the best things to happen to the Yankees in the mid-1980s - the 14-year barf - was Don Baylor. He came over from California, where he'd killed us for six years. He batted behind Dave Winfield (and in front of, ugh, Steve Kemp.) These were the Yankees of Mumphrey and Smalley, after Dale Murray had been obtained for Jay Buhner. There wasn't much to cheer. But Baylor always carried himself like a star.

I remember Bill White telling how when the Yankees were visiting Texas, Baylor's old stomping grounds, he'd made calls to old friends, and the clubhouse was stocked with barbecued ribs - the best Phil Rizzuto ever tasted. Those were the days. And that was a great teammate. 

He died today at age 68. Twilight of the gods, folks. Twilight of the gods...


9 comments:

Anonymous said...

IT WAS FUN TO SEE "GROOVE" COME TO THE PLATE.

NUMBER #25 WITH US.

HE WAS THE ONLY GUY I EVER REMEMBER THAT WHEN HE GOT HIT BY THE PITCH, HE LOOKED TOTALLY UNFAZED AS HE HAPPILY FLIPPED HIS BAT, AND TROTTED TO FIRST BASE.

Local Bargain Jerk said...


...after Dale Murray had been obtained for Jay Buhner.

Murray for Buhner? It was Phelps, man. Ken Phelps.

Vampifella said...

Oddly I always thought of Baylor as a Red Sox. I got into baseball in 1986 during the Mets Craze and of course he was part of villainous Sux! I don't remember him as a Yankee or anything prior to that.

Moeteef said...

My baseball people kept saying Ken Phelps, Ken Phelps...

Remember Scooter saying "He will not rub!" When Baylor got hit? Twilight of the Gods, indeed.

el duque said...

You're right LBJ. I stand corrected. I was Murray for Fred McGriff.

HoraceClarke66 said...

McGee for Sykes.

McGriff for Murray.

Buhner for Phelps.

The unholy trinity of the 1980s.

Anonymous said...

WOW, I FORGOT MCGEE FOR SYKES.

WHAT DISASTERS.

Alphonso said...

Okay historians; how did we get Chuck Knoblauch?

HoraceClarke66 said...

For Eric Milton and Cristian Guzman, right, that shortstop? And somebody else, maybe a pitcher who didn't make it.

I remember Milton pitched a no-hitter, but he was never great shakes.