Wednesday, April 21, 2021

The Greatest World Series Ever: 1951 Yankees vs. 1998 Yankees, Game 4

Can the 1998 Yankees tie the series, or will the 1951 Yanks move within a game of the title? It's time for Game 4 of the Greatest World Series Ever. We're once again at the old Yankee Stadium. 

Here we go.

The lineups:

1998 Yankees: Chuck Knoblauch, 2B; Paul O'Neill, RF; Bernie Williams, CF; Derek Jeter, SS; Tino Martinez, 1B; Scott Brosius, 3B; Jorge Posada, C; Chad Curtis, DH; Shane Spencer, LF. Starting Pitcher: Orlando Hernandez.

1951 Yankees:  Phil Rizzuto, SS; Hank Bauer, RF; Yogi Berra, C; Gil McDougald, 3B; Gene Woodling, LF; Mickey Mantle, CF; Bobby Brown, DH; Joe Collins, 1B; Jerry Coleman, 2B. Starting Pitcher: Eddie Lopat.

Time for the first pitch. Click below to find out details about the game.



Top of the 1st: Chuck Knoblauch leads the game off with a single. He moves to second base on a wild pitch from Eddie Lopat and to third when Paul O'Neill flies out to right. A Bernie Williams groundout to short is enough to score Knoblauch and give the 1998 team the lead. Derek Jeter seems an odd choice by Joe Torre to bat cleanup, but he rewards him with an opposite field home run. Score: 1998 2, 1951 0

Bottom of the 6th: Orlando Hernandez has been rolling up to this point, but Gil McDougald comes up with 2 out and nobody on and rips a liner into the seats in right, making it a one-run ballgame. Score: 1998 2, 1951 1

Bottom of the 7th: Mickey Mantle leads off by taking a 3-2 pitch for a walk. After Bobby Brown pops out to short and Joe Collins lines out to third, Casey Stengel send up Joe DiMaggio to pinch-hit for Jerry Coleman. DiMaggio, who has sat on the bench for the entire series so far, gets a huge standing ovation from the Yankee Stadium crowd. The cheers get even louder as Joe D. rips one to the gap in left-center for a double, scoring Mantle from first to tie the game. Phil Rizzuto strikes out to strand DiMaggio. Score: Tied, 2-2. 

Bottom of the 8th: Joe Torre brings in Mariano Rivera with the 2-3-4 hitters due up. Hank Bauer, who has had a great series, leads off with a line single to left. Yogi Berra is thrown out on a slow roller, but Bauer moves to second. McDougald hits a shallow fly to left and the runner holds, but Woodling fists a 3-2 pitch into centerfield for a bloop single and Bauer scores to give the 1951 Yankees the lead. Mantle grounds out to first base to end the inning. Score: 1951 3, 1998 2. 

Top of the 9th: Joe Ostrowski, who came in for Lopat in the 8th, gets the first two outs before Stengel calls on Art Schallock to try and get the final out. Schallock walks the No. 9 hitter, Shane Spencer, and then loses Knoblauch and walks him as well to put runners on first and second. Paul O'Neill then pulls a single to right, scoring Spencer to tie the game and moving Knoblauch to third. Bernie Williams then hits a hard grounder up the middle to plate Knoblauch and give the lead back to the 1998 team. Derek Jeter hits a high fly to center to end the inning. Score: 1998 4, 1951 3.

Bottom of the 9th: Rivera still in the game, but going for the win rather than the save. Luis Sojo takes over for Knoblauch at second. (In an odd move by Torre, Chili Davis takes over for Bernie Williams in centerfield. Torre was tight-lipped about the move after the game. "I had my reasons. Next question.") Bobby Brown grounds out to short to start the inning. Johnny Mize pinch-hits for Joe Collins and draws a walk, bringing up Billy Martin, who took over at second base after DiMaggio pinch-hit for Coleman in the 7th. No World Series heroics for Martin today, though, as he hits into a 4-6-3 double play to end the game. 

FINAL SCORE: 1998 Yankees 4, 1951 Yankees 3

We are all tied up headed to Game 5.

Game 5 pitching matchup: Vic Raschi vs. David Cone.

The boxscore:



3 comments:

el duque said...

I wish I were at the computer for that moment when DiMaggio stepped to the plate.

Goosebumps.

HoraceClarke66 said...

So...DiMaggio with one, pinch-hit at-bat in 4 games.

Rivera hit hard again.

Jeter batting fourth.

Chili Davis coming in as a defensive replacement for Bernie Williams in centerfield (By 1998, Davis had not played the field—anywhere—in 4 years. He had not played center for 10 years.)

Bernie, I have to tell you this: The computer is planning to kill you. You must shut it down—now. A further warning: Do NOT discuss this with anyone inside your domicile. It has cameras everywhere and can read lips!

BernBabyBern said...

Hoss,

I ain't worried about the computer coming after me.

If it's playing Chili Davis in center, it ain't that smart.